Tuesday, August 22, 2017

EDC Saves the day! 3 lessons Learned



A couple days ago something happened to me that in my opinion perfectly illustrates what EDC is all about.
My wife needed something from the grocery store down the street, just a couple blocks away. Its pretty close but I like going with her so that she doesn’t have to carry heave stuff.  I was wearing just underwear and a tshirt. It’s pretty hot around here in Costa del Sol this time of the year. So I quickly put on my 5.11 taclite shorts and head out with her. Since it was just a couple blocks I didn’t bother checking my EDC much, it was just what I had in my pant’s pockets.
As we approached the store,  we saw these two cars parked, several people were screaming and a baby crying.
Some bystanders were staring but didn't want to get involved in what seemed to be a family dispute, but there was a lot of shouting and crying, mostly around the baby which the woman kept pressed against her chest.
My wife told me not to get involved, and usually I wouldn't but the baby crying was a bit too much. It crossed my mind that if that was my wife and that was one of my kids, I would want people to help and not just stand there.
I approached them and asked what’s going on but I already saw that the baby's ear was somehow stuck to its mother chest.
"Scissors! Scissors!" they all started shouting when they notice me. I had my Leatherman Charge with me so I brought it out.
Somehow the baby got its earring stuck awfully bad in its mother's bunched up top, pulling at the ear almost to the point of tearing the baby's ear off, which looked like an elastic band about to snap.
The Leatherman Charge has a hook for cutting belts but push cutting was not an option. The baby's ear was pulling extremely tight and I saw no chance of using the hook without ripping the baby’s ear. Even the serrated emergency blade seemed like a poor option, so I used the main blade which out of pure coincidence I had sharpened razor sharp a few days ago. All this went through my mind in a fraction of a second.
So the baby was desperately crying, the mother was crying, what I assume was the grandma was pulling and holding the clothes for me to cut and the idiot husband and some other guy were shouting and pushing at the mother for her to stay still and none of them would stop moving. And I had like 1/4 of an inch of room to put the tip of the knife through and cut, which I did. As soon as I touched the fabric it cut through it like a hot knife through butter. The baby was free with a piece of cloth still attached to her earing and the mom had a big hole on her top.
Anyway, never thought I'd end up using my Leatherman for that in a million years. It was as these things usually are, completely unexpected.
After a decade of continuous use, I can say my Leatherman Charge has been the tool that I have used the most, the one that has been more critical when needed and the last one I would want to part with. I just cant recommend it enough. If its too pricy, the Leatherman Wave is every bit as functional, just make sure you get the pocket clip for it and carry the thing every day.


A few lessons learned:
1)Carry your edc. You never know when it may come in handy. Even more critical, you never know when it can prevent serious injury or even death. This time it was a baby’s ear. Sometimes it’s a rope or cord, or wire around someone’s neck. Or clothes or hair caught in machinery. A couple years ago I remember a kid dying when accidentally tangling cord around his neck and slipping in a slide in a playground. You just never know, but having a cutting tool, wire cutters and saw to break someone free may be critical when seconds count.



2) Layers work. That day I left home without my wallet, which I take with me 99% of the time when I walk out the door. I could have easily left behind the tools I ended up needed. My point is that you need to plan on screwing up, and here is where layers of tools make a big different. My keys are that core layer. There I have my trusty Minichamp and a spare AAA flashlight. If nothing else, I have those. Since I need the keys to open the door and get back into my house, chances are very slim that I’ll leave home without them.

3)Keep your EDC in top notch condition. Your tools need to be checked and serviced. Your CCW needs to be fired often, your ammo replaced, magazines checked. Your flashlight needs to have working batteries, and your knife should be as sharp as realistically possible. Some people that carry knives carry DULL blades. This simply isn’t acceptable. I’ve used the blade in my Leatherman Charge more than any other knife in recent years. It’s visibly worn but it is razor sharp and I touch it up when I notice it isn’t biting as much. In this case, like when a baby’s ear is stuck and you need to cut with as little effort as possible, then it’s crucial for that blade to be like a scalpel.
Take care people, and don’t leave your EDC behind!

FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

Thursday, August 17, 2017

New terror attack in Barcelona: 5 easy tips to Remember



You probably know by now that a van plowed into the crowd on Las Ramblas avenue in Barcelona, killing 13 and injuring 100 people.

As soon as I heard about the attack I called my brother who was visiting family in Barcelona. Fortunately he left yesterday, a day earlier than expected. He had been thinking of staying another day. He easily could have been caught walking La Rambla if they had stayed another day.
Another terrorist attack, another lunatic picking a big vehicle and just mowing people.

What can you do?
You can’t do much to stop these events because cars are readily available and it takes very little research to figure out the most packed locations.
You can do something about letting known terrorist out and about. You can deport know radicals rather than give them some slack and just hope they don’t murder innocent people.
Above all, you can remove every single mosque that doesn’t publicly condemn these attacks and cooperates with authorities 100%. The number of imams that refuse to do so is astonishing and getting rid of those would be a big step forward in getting rid of their most visible and obvious indoctrination centres. It seems though that not enough blood has been spilled to overcome political correctness.
What can you do on a more personal level?

1)Know where they attack. They usually go for high profile targets. Large, emblematic cities, attacking in their centres.

2)Avoid these potential targets, especially at time of peak activity with target rich locations. Concerts, festivals, peak holyday season. Wherever you have a lot of people packed together, that’s an ideal target for a terrorist. I’m not saying not to live your life, just understand the risks when it comes to terrorists.

3)Awareness. Mind your surroundings. Look ahead of you and behind you. What’s going on 100 yards ahead and 100 yards behind. LISTEN. This is usually a great indicator of trouble. Shots fired, screams. In my experience you usually hear trouble before you see it.

4)Take action. Avoid being the deer caught in the headlights. When you see, listen or feel something is wrong, do something. In most cases that “something” should be start moving towards a safer direction, either getting behind cover, avoiding a speeding vehicle or attacker heading towards you.

5) Carry your EDC kit, especially a first aid kit in your EDC bag when at high risk locations as the ones mentioned above. Celox gauze, a tourniquet. Add a blow out kit if you got trainning on how to use it. Don’t forget your EDC, a knife can be used to cut open clothes, remove cords or clothes or seatbelts wrapped around people’s neck. Heck, I used my knife today to help out a baby girl in the street (more on this tomorrow) Where and when legal, you should carry your CCW too.

FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Get yourself a Busse INFI Dog Soldier knife



If you’re looking for some INFI steel knife from Busse they have a pretty neat knife available at the moment for $259.95 called the INFI Dog Soldier.

INFI knives are usually around the 350ish to 500 buck range so the $259 price, while high, isnt that bad. Especially given that these days any 1095 "survival"  knife costs around or above 100 bucks. Good stainless steel knives often twice as much.
Busse knives are often sold out in a matter of days and resold at higher prices.In particular INFI steel blades tend to be pretty expensive as you probably know, so while the price isnt cheap, you do get something neat in the knife world, but also a steel that is actually excellent. and you get to pick the blade color finish.

No, I don’t make a single buck out of this, no commission of any kind, but I do write about these knives at times and they aren’t always easy to acquire so this is your chance if you want a high end blade. Here's the link.
http://www.bussecombat.com/infi-dog-soldier/
The current offer is the Dog Soldier, 6.25 inch blade, .210" thick. A solid blade geometry, great Respirine C grip. The only thing I’d like to have is a matte or satin polished finish but I can live with the black finish too, especially at that price.
Get one while you can if interested, supply tends to be limited. In fact I’m posting this because I already ordered mine, which I will review once I receive it.
Take care!
FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Concealed Carry: When 47 rounds is not Enough



This is a great story, explaining why this cop went from carrying 47 rounds of 45ACP to 145 rounds of 9mm. It just goes to show with a real-world incident why you probably need to carry more ammo and why that 5-shot sunbnose, while sure better than nothing, may still not be enough.

Why one cop carries 145 rounds of ammo on the job

Sergeant Timothy Gramins went from 45 ACP to 9mm (sacriledge! Right? Well, no) after 14 hits on a lone attacker with his .45 Glock 21, of which six should have been show stoppers (heart, right lung, left lung, liver, diaphragm, and right kidney) failed to stop his assailant. And attacker that was not under the influence of narcotics but just very determined to kill him.
He went from a Glock 21 to Glock 17 (Glock 26 as backup). Three spare 17-round  mags and a couple 33-round mags on his vest.
I would have gone with a tad less ammo and more power per round with a Glock 31 in 357SIG, but that’s just me. ;-)
FerFAL
Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Seal Team Six E&E kit: cash, Copenhagen and cigarettes





Sure they have some great gear, and small survival tin kits with a lot of useful tools (and of course the training to go along with it) but I think it’s interesting that Robert O'Neill mentions CASH as the first thing that comes to mind if he ever has to make his way home on his own after a mission. What does he do when he gets a call right before getting in a plane to go God knows where? Hit the ATM for as much cash as he can and buys some tobacco.


“I know I’m going to jump somewhere but I don’t know where I’m going to end up. And I can buy my way home with money, or somewhere else I can barter with tobacco…plus I love tobacco”.


Folks that have never been to 3rd world countries just don’t understand the power of a 20, 50, let alone 100 USD bill. With absurd conversion rates in most of the third world, a 50 dollar bill is in parts of the world more money than the average person there will see in the same place in his entire life. You can buy shelter, food, you can buy transportation or even loyalty. 

Cash is king indeed.

FerFAL